Archivio di febbraio 2012

paper architecture

mercoledì 1 febbraio 2012

Sicuramente le città (ri)costruite da Ingrid Siliakus non hanno problemi di polveri sottili e di inquinamento. Le sue architetture di carta, iperrealiste o astratte che siano, hanno sempre un che di magico e surreale. 
Lavorare la carta richiede ingegno e un lavoro paziente: Ingrid realizza da 20 a 30 prototipi, costruisce piano dopo piano, strato dopo strato, prima di arrivare all’edificio totalmente in 3D.

Un lavoro da equilibrista urbana per costruire questi skyline di carta, come dichiara lei stessa:
‘…Working with paper forces me to be humble, since this medium has a character of its own that asks for cooperation. It is a challenge to find this cooperation with each separate paper brand I work with. Working with paper the way I do, namely by means of cutting and folding creating paper sculptures, asks of me to work with meditative precision. Paper architecture does not bare haste, it is its enemy; one moment of loss of concentration, can lead to failure of a piece…’

© Ingrid Siliakus (1955),
Paper architect/artist,
Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

For sure the cities (re)built by Ingrid Siliakus don’t have to cope with daily problems related to polluted air. Her paper architectures, both hyper realistic or abstract, always feature a taste of magic and surreal.
Building using paper requires wit and a patient work: Ingrid makes 20 or 30 prototypes, builds floor after floor, layer after layer, before getting to the final 3D paper building.

A real urban tightrope walker to build these paper skylines, as she declared:
‘…Working with paper forces me to be humble, since this medium has a character of its own that asks for cooperation. It is a challenge to find this cooperation with each separate paper brand I work with. Working with paper the way I do, namely by means of cutting and folding creating paper sculptures, asks of me to work with meditative precision. Paper architecture does not bare haste, it is its enemy; one moment of loss of concentration, can lead to failure of a piece…’